Once upon a time a tribe of people called Marketers prospered in a bountiful land.

Some Marketers became wealthy and famous using the Traditions handed down by generations. One particular Tradition, called Interrupting, was especially fruitful and popular. It had many aspects, such as phoning people you don’t know to sell them duct cleaning. Sometimes the duct cleaner Marketers even mailed flyers, letters or postcards to promote their service.

TV and radio advertising blasted the airwaves in the Marketers’ land. And it wasn’t just duct cleaners–mattress companies, soft drink manufacturers, funeral homes, restaurants and drug stores also participated in this Marketers Tradition.

When computers were invented, Marketers embraced the new technology with more Interrupting Traditions. Email and pop-up ads proliferated, selling everything from books, credit cards, consulting services and more.

One day a rock band called The Grateful Dead came to the Marketers land. They were different from other bands—their business model was built on touring, instead of on album sales. The Grateful Dead encouraged live audiences to record their concerts and trade tapes with one another, plus they built a database that allowed them to sell concert tickets directly to their fans.

The Dead (as they were affectionately known) quickly attracted a loyal following. Some fans attended so many concerts they could barely remember how many.

The Grateful Dead became very popular with a small group of Marketers. If The Grateful Dead can have avid groupies, one of them asked, why can’t we?

Fans aren’t just for rock stars, realized another.

I’m really tired of being interrupted by duct cleaners who phone at dinner time, said a third. What if we invited people to sign up to get information from us? And then only sent information to those people?

Let’s share information about duct cleaning, said a fourth. And then let our duct cleaning fans share it with others.

And so a new tribe of Marketers was born, who called themselves Inbound Marketers.

The Inbound Marketers traveled the land to share their wisdom. At first, some Marketers were reluctant to embrace their new ideas. Initially there were misconceptions about the Inbound Marketers, but eventually these misconceptions came to be known as fairy tales only simpletons believed.

If you haven’t heard about these fairy tales it’s worth taking a look:

#1 Inbound marketing doesn’t work

Inbound marketing DOES work and I’ve got the analytics to prove it. Since I started inbound marketing my web visitors and visits to conversions both increased over 200%.

online-marketing-myths

And I’m not the only one.

Just head on over to HubSpot’s case studies to read about countless other companies successfully using inbound marketing to build their business.

#2 Only good writers can be content creators

Content creation is one of the most important aspects of inbound marketing. But you don’t have to be a great writer to create content others want to read.

I read a lot of marketing blogs every day and very few of them are written by really great writers. If you’ve got a good idea and basic written literacy skills, you can definitely blog and create premium content.

#3 Lead nurturing is just email with a fancy name

Lead nurturing is email–plus a whole lot more.

When a web visitor converts into a lead on your site by downloading a piece of premium content, it’s an indication they’ve got a problem you can help solve.

For example, if they download your eBook on how to find an inbound marketing company, they’ll want to read more about the topic.

And that’s exactly what lead nurturing does. It provides them with more information that positions you as an expert, while moving leads through the sales funnel until they become customers.

#4 Leads leave fake names on conversion forms

This fairy tale is partially true. Some leads do leave fake names. But in my experience, most people leave their real names, email addresses and phone numbers.

Inbound marketing is a numbers game. If a few leads are phonies, that’s OK since I’m nurturing a lot of other people in my funnel who are real AND really interested in our PR, social media and online marketing services.

 

This post was inspired by Marketing Lessons from the Grateful Dead by David Meerman Scott and Brian Halligan.

 

YOUR TURN

What do you think about these inbound marketing fairy tales? Are they true? Or just myths to which Traditional Marketers are clinging?



 



Written by Shelley Pringle